Bitcoin and Blockchain Conferences for 2020, Rated and ...

I just presented my paper titled "A First Look at the Usability of Bitcoin Key Management" in San Diego Usable Security Conference

I just presented my paper titled "A First Look at the Usability of Bitcoin Key Management" in San Diego Usable Security Conference. Here is the link to the paper: http://www.internetsociety.org/doc/first-look-usability-bitcoin-key-management
tl;dr abstract: Bitcoin users are directly or indirectly forced to deal with public key cryptography, which has a number of security and usability challenges that differ from the password-based authentication underlying most online banking services. Users must ensure that keys are simultaneously accessible, resistant to digital theft and resilient to loss. In this paper, we contribute an evaluation framework for comparing Bitcoin key management approaches, and conduct a broad usability evaluation of six representative Bitcoin clients. We find that Bitcoin shares many of the fundamental challenges of key management known from other domains, but that Bitcoin may present a unique opportunity to rethink key management for end users.
submitted by shayanbahal to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Cryptocurrency Market - Bitcoin Private "Post Fork" San Diego Conference - By Tai Zen

Cryptocurrency Market - Bitcoin Private submitted by Yanlii to cryptovideos [link] [comments]

Tone Vays Tears Down the ‘Blockchain Not Bitcoin’ Meme at San Diego Conference

Tone Vays Tears Down the ‘Blockchain Not Bitcoin’ Meme at San Diego Conference submitted by hugolp to btc [link] [comments]

Inside Bitcoins Conference in San Diego, California - 2015

Inside Bitcoins Conference in San Diego, California - 2015 submitted by GinoRossi to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Tone Vays Tears Down the ‘Blockchain Not Bitcoin’ Meme at San Diego Conference | Blockchain Agenda with Inside Bitcoins

Tone Vays Tears Down the ‘Blockchain Not Bitcoin’ Meme at San Diego Conference | Blockchain Agenda with Inside Bitcoins submitted by kyletorpey to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Tone Vays Tears Down the ‘Blockchain Not Bitcoin’ Meme at San Diego Conference | Fuck yeah!

Tone Vays Tears Down the ‘Blockchain Not Bitcoin’ Meme at San Diego Conference | Fuck yeah! submitted by mrdontplay to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Tone Vays Tears Down the ‘Blockchain Not Bitcoin’ Meme at San Diego Conference

Tone Vays Tears Down the ‘Blockchain Not Bitcoin’ Meme at San Diego Conference submitted by voyagerdoge to DogeNews [link] [comments]

Tone Vays Tears Down the Blockchain Not Bitcoin Meme at San Diego Conference | Blockchain Agenda with Inside Bitcoins

Tone Vays Tears Down the Blockchain Not Bitcoin Meme at San Diego Conference | Blockchain Agenda with Inside Bitcoins submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Tone Vays Tears Down the Blockchain Not Bitcoin Meme at San Diego Conference | Fuck yeah!

Tone Vays Tears Down the Blockchain Not Bitcoin Meme at San Diego Conference | Fuck yeah! submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Tone Vays Tears Down the ‘Blockchain Not Bitcoin’ Meme at San Diego Conference | Blockchain Agenda with Inside Bitcoins

Tone Vays Tears Down the ‘Blockchain Not Bitcoin’ Meme at San Diego Conference | Blockchain Agenda with Inside Bitcoins submitted by mrdontplay to WhaleBitcoinTradeLogs [link] [comments]

Inside Bitcoins Conference in San Diego, California - 2015

Inside Bitcoins Conference in San Diego, California - 2015 submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

San Diego Bitcoin Conference

San Diego Bitcoin Conference submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

In the news • Fintechist - Don’t Miss Early Bird Passes for San Diego’s Premiere Bitcoins Conference

submitted by btcforumbot to BtcForum [link] [comments]

Daily analysis of cryptocurrencies 20191013(Market index 38 — Fear state)

Daily analysis of cryptocurrencies 20191013(Market index 38 — Fear state)

https://preview.redd.it/hzctzj543as31.jpg?width=1280&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=554c916c38afa73a36bdb163c610d901f1d56271

US Dollar Dominates 62.38% Of The Fiat-To-BTC Trading Market As of 04:12 (UTC) on October 13, Coinhills statistics show that the US Dollar remains the most traded national currency for Bitcoin with a significant market share of 62.38%, followed by the Japanese Yen (19.24%), the Korean Won (11.90%), the Euro (4.46%) and the British Pound (0.98%).
Litecoin Foundation Partners With Film Festival Amid ‘Depleted Funds’ Allegations The Litecoin Foundation recently revealed its partnership with the San Diego International Film Festival. Through this collaboration, the foundation will provide audience with LTCs which is expected to be used to vote for the films nominated in the forthcoming film festival. A Litecoin Foundation award along with a $1,000 worth LTC will be given to the film or filmmaker with the most number of LTC donations.
Whale Alert: 1000 BTC Transferred From Bitstamp To Unknown Wallet “1,000 #BTC (8,380,470 USD) transferred from #Bitstamp to unknown wallet,” Whale Alert tweeted. The transaction hash is 1397f8e570ec545ea558cf21e8007936bea4ea895a65def750df4ed2ffecf866.
IRS Gets Serious About Crypto With Amendments To Form 1040 Regulators are taking cryptocurrencies more and more seriously, and the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) seems to be leading the way with a plan to obtain more accurate information from taxpayers regarding their financial activities with cryptocurrencies. A new checkbox on Form 1040 now asks taxpayers whether “at anytime during 2019 did [they] received, sell, send, exchanged or otherwise acquire any financial interest in any virtual currency.” The IRS put this new checkbox at the top of Schedule 1, so it does not appear directly as a declarable income on the front page of Form 1040. However, taxpayers are not exempt from declaring this information even though they are not obligated to file Schedule 1.

Encrypted project calendar(October 13, 2019)

LINK/ChainLink: ChainLink (LINK) will be held in Tokyo on October 13th by a collaboration between QuarkChain, bitgrit, Chainlink and Vechain.

Encrypted project calendar(October 14, 2019)

BCH/Bitcoin Cash: The ChainPoint 19 conference will be held in Armenia from October 14th to 15th. Veros (VRS): 14 October 2019 Launch of News Service “Launch of the VEROS NEWS service.” Skycoin (SKY): 14 October 2019 Hardware Release “New hardware product launch.”

Encrypted project calendar(October 15, 2019)

RUFF/RUFF Token: Ruff will end the three-month early bird program on October 15th KAT/Kambria: Kambria (KAT) exchanges ERC20 KAT for a 10% bonus on BEP2 KAT-7BB, and the token exchange reward will end on October 15. BTC/Bitcoin: The Blockchain Technology Investment Summit (CIS) will be held in Los Angeles from October 15th to 16th. OTOCASH (OTO): 15 October 2019 Escodex Shutdown “ All OTO HOLDERs who have assets on ESCODEX EXCHANGE to immediately withdraw your assets before October 15th, 2019 4:00 PM” (CRYPTO): 15 October 2019 Hard Fork Summit Hard Fork Summit 2019 by TNW . “Where finance and business meets tech.” Amsterdam, October 15–17. Cardano (ADA): 15 October 2019 NYC Meetup “Next week on October 15th Nathan Kaiser, Chairperson of the Cardano Foundation, will be in attendance to meet community members in NYC FunFair (FUN): 15 October 2019 Marketing AMA “The FunFair Marketing AMA… will be held on Tuesday the 15th of October at 2pm in the Live team chat channel on Discord Ark (ARK): 15 October 2019 ARK Core v2.6 on Devnet “We are very excited to announce #ARK Core v2.6 will be launching on #Devnet, October 15th, 2019! “ DigiByte (DGB): 15 October 2019 BitMart Listing DigiByte (DGB) will be listed on BitMart Exchange on October 15, 2019. The following trading pair will be available: DGB/BTC. ThoreNext (THX): 15 October 2019 Staking Goes Live “Staking live from 15 OCT 2019.”

Encrypted project calendar(October 16, 2019)

BTC/Bitcoin: The 2019 Blockchain Life Summit will be held in Moscow, Russia from October 16th to 17th. MIOTA/IOTA: IOTA (MIOTA) IOTA will host a community event on the theme of “Technology Problem Solving and Testing IoT Devices” at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles on October 16. ETH/Ethereum: Ethereum launches Istanbul (Istanbul) main network upgrade, this main network upgrade involves 6 code upgrades. QTUM/Qtum: Qtum (QTUM) Qtum main network hard fork is scheduled for October 16. (CRYPTO): and 1 other 16 October 2019 Supply Chains Unblocked Supply Chains Unblocked in London from 9:30 AM — 6 PM. Binance Coin (BNB): 16 October 2019 Singapore Meetup “Bring your friends to come along with, & it will be FUN! With snacks and drinks.” IoTeX (IOTX): 16 October 2019 Mainet Beta “The next evolution of IoTeX blockchain, secure IoT hardware, and decentralized identity is coming October 16 — mark your calendars.” Selfkey (KEY): 16 October 2019 Corporate Wallet Release “Soon, wallet users will be able to manage corporate profiles and identity attributes.” Cardano (ADA): 16 October 2019 Washington D.C. Meetup “Nathan Kaiser, Chairperson of the Cardano Foundation, will join the community in Washington DC on Oct 16, and talk about the recent

Encrypted project calendar(October 17, 2019)

Holo (HOT): 17 October 2019 Redgrid AMA “Join us for the AMA with RedGrid on October 17th. Submit your questions before the AMA on our Holochain Dev Forum.” IOST (IOST): 17 October 2019 Breeding Competition Ends “Join IOST 2nd Breeding Competition by @FishChainGame now! The competition only lasts till 17 Oct” Aragon (ANT): 17 October 2019 Seoul Meetup “You are invited to join @licuende for a meetup and presentation on ‘Aragon and DAOs: What’s next after ICOs and DeFi?’” Skycoin (SKY): 17 October 2019 NYC Skywire Meetup NYC Skywire Mainnet Meetup in NYC from 6–8 PM. Horizen (ZEN): 17 October 2019 Weekly Insider Team updates at 3:30 PM UTC/ 11:30 AM EDT: Engineering, Node network, Product/UX, Helpdesk, Legal, BD, Marketing, CEO Closing thoughts, AMA.

Encrypted project calendar(October 18, 2019)

BTC/Bitcoin: The SEC will give a pass on the VanEck/SolidX ETF on October 18th and make a final decision HB/HeartBout: HeartBout (HB) will officially release the Android version of the HeartBout app on October 18. OKB (OKB): 18 October 2019 Rotterdam Meetup “Meet us in Rotterdam on 18 Oct as we partner up with Crypto010 Meetup to bring you a talk on ‘Decentralized Finance’.” HeartBout (HB): 18 October 2019 Android Version “18th of October 2019 will be officially released Android version of HeartBout app.” BTU Protocol (BTU): and 2 others 18 October 2019 Paris Blockchain Summit The event will gather major international key players of the Blockchain ecosystem including well-known influencers, investors, government…

Encrypted project calendar(October 19, 2019)

PI/PCHAIN Network: The PCHAIN (PI) backbone (Phase 5, 82 nodes, 164, 023, 802 $ PI, 7 candidates) will begin on October 19. LINK/ChainLink: Diffusion 2019 will be held in Berlin, Germany from October 19th to 20th DeepBrain Chain (DBC): 19 October 2019 (or earlier) Deploy Main Chain “Deploy Main Chain,” during the third week of October. General Event (CRYPTO): and 1 other 19 October 2019 Free State Blockchain “This “unconference” style event brings together some of the top financial tech innovators, researchers, company leaders, and other…” PCHAIN (PI): 19 October 2019 Main Chain Voting “Main chain: Epoch 5, 82 nodes, 164,023,802 $PI, 7 Candidates, voting will start on Oct. 19th.” Nash Exchange (NEX): 19 October 2019 Nash Anniversary Nash will present their work from the third quarter of 2019. Team members will be present and to answer your questions in person.

Encrypted project calendar(October 20, 2019)

GameCredits (GAME): 20 October 2019 (or earlier) Mining Reward Drop GameCredits mining reward will be cut in half at block 2519999 (~October 20). This will be the 4th halvening of the GAME mining reward! Aeternity (AE): 20 October 2019 Starfleet 3 App Deadline #Starfleet3 is happening in Malta and you have by October 20th to apply!

Encrypted project calendar(October 21, 2019)

KNC/Kyber Network: The official online hackathon of the Kyber Network (KNC) project will end on October 21st, with more than $42,000 in prize money. Horizen (ZEN): 21 October 2019 Sidechains Alpha Release Horizen releasing the alpha version of industry first decentralized and unfederated sidechains.

Encrypted project calendar(October 22, 2019)

ZRX/0x: The 0x protocol (ZRX) Pantera blockchain summit will be held on October 22.

Encrypted project calendar(October 23, 2019)

MIOTA/IOTA: IOTA (MIOTA) IOTA will host a community event on October 23rd at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles with the theme “Connecting the I3 Market and Experiencing Purchase and Sales Data.” BTC/Bitcoin: The WBS World Blockchain Summit (Middle East) will be held in Dubai from October 23rd to 24th.

Encrypted project calendar(October 24, 2019)

BCN/Bytecoin: Bytecoin (BCN) released the hidden amount of the Bytecoin block network on October 24.

Encrypted project calendar(October 25, 2019)

ADA/Cardano: Cardano (ADA) The Ada community will host a community gathering in the Dominican Republic for the first time on October 25.

Encrypted project calendar(October 26, 2019)

KAT/Kambria: Kambria (KAT) Kambria will host the 2019 Southern California Artificial Intelligence and Data Science Conference in Los Angeles on October 26th with IDEAS. BTC/Bitcoin: CoinAgenda Global Summit will be held in Las Vegas from October 26th to 28th

Encrypted project calendar(October 28, 2019)

LTC/Litecoin: Litecoin (LTC) 2019 Litecoin Summit will be held from October 28th to October 29th in Las Vegas, USA BTC/Bitcoin: Mt.Gox changes the debt compensation plan submission deadline to October 28 ZEC/Zcash: Zcash (ZEC) will activate the Blossom Agreement on October 28th

Encrypted project calendar(October 29, 2019)

BTC/Bitcoin: The 2nd World Encryption Conference (WCC) will be held in Las Vegas from October 29th to 31st.

Encrypted project calendar(October 30, 2019)

MIOTA/IOTA: IOTA (MIOTA) IOTA will host a community event on October 30th at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles on the topic “How to store data on IOTA Tangle.”

Encrypted project calendar(November 1, 2019)

INS/Insolar: The Insolar (INS) Insolar wallet and the redesigned Insolar Block Explorer will be operational on November 1, 2019.

Encrypted project calendar(November 6, 2019)

STEEM/Steem: The Steem (STEEM) SteemFest 4 conference will be held in Bangkok from November 6th to 10th.

Encrypted project calendar(November 8, 2019)

BTC/Bitcoin: The 2nd Global Digital Mining Summit will be held in Frankfurt, Germany from October 8th to 10th.

Encrypted project calendar(November 9, 2019)

CENNZ/Centrality: Centrality (CENNZ) will meet in InsurTechNZ Connect — Insurance and Blockchain on October 9th in Auckland.

This past week, BTC gained strong bullish momentum above the $8,300 and $8,350 resistances against the US Dollar. The BTC/USD pair climbed more than 5% and broke the $8,500 and $8,700 resistance levels. Moreover, there was a close above $8,500 and the 100 simple moving average (4-hours). A new monthly high was formed near the $8,934 level and later the price started a sharp downward move.
The price broke the $8,800 and $8,500 support levels. Additionally, there was a break below the 50% Fib retracement level of the upward move from the $7,763 low to $8,934 high. More importantly, there was a break below a key bullish trend line with support near $8,420 on the 4-hours chart of the BTC/USD pair. The pair even traded below the $8,350 support area.
At the moment, the price is consolidating losses above the $8,300 support area. It seems like there is a strong support forming near the $8,300 level and the 100 simple moving average (4-hours). Moreover, the 61.8% Fib retracement level of the upward move from the $7,763 low to $8,934 high is also near the $8,300. If there is a downside break below the $8,300 support area, bitcoin price could move back into a bearish zone.
The next key support area is near the $8,250 level, below which it could move towards the $8,000 level. On the upside, there is a major hurdle forming near the $8,500 and $8,550 levels. A convincing close above the $8,550 resistance area could set the tone for more upsides in the coming sessions.
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Today in History 02/08





submitted by Pickup_your_nuts to ConservativeKiwi [link] [comments]

Behind Bitcoin Smart Contract Developer’s Push to Court Silicon Valley Programmers

Behind Bitcoin Smart Contract Developer’s Push to Court Silicon Valley Programmers

https://preview.redd.it/2t18k82wpqi31.png?width=741&format=png&auto=webp&s=13843bbed56b2317d2e866a1801c82547a8d8bdb
Article by Forbes: Justin O’Connell
IOVLabs, the parent of RSK, is opening a Blockchain Innovation and Development Studio in San Francisco. RSK, the first major Bitcoin sidechain bringing Ethereum-style smart contracts to Bitcoin, launched the studio to support experimentation with and development of next-generation blockchain solutions.
The studio, led by CAP Ventures Partner Ariel Muslera, and tasked with creating new developer tools for decentralized infrastructures, plans to collaborate with startups and companies to identify real-world problems. Being in Silicon Valley will allow the company to forge relationships with the developer community there — including non-blockchain developers.
RSK historically has worked to solve problems at the low-level of the Bitcoin protocol (RSK Smart Contracts and RIF OS Infrastructure Services, for instance) to turn the Bitcoin ecosystem into a new global financial system. The studio is designed to solve problems for the Application layer, which Diego Gutiérrez Zaldívar, the RIF Labs and RSK CEO, calls the “final layer”.
In San Francisco, RSK plans to connect with the developer community. “Of course, San Francisco and Silicon Valley is one of the top communities, if not the top community, for developers and startups in the world, and we think the future of blockchain and mass adoption is related to making these technologies easy to use for developers,” said Gutiérrez-Zaldívar. And not necessarily just blockchain developers.
“So far we have been pushing developers into a steep learning curve of getting into the inner workings of blockchain and decentralized technology,” said Gutiérrez-Zaldívar, one of the first people to foster and develop Bitcoin and blockchain technology in Latin America. “The developer studio that we started here has the purpose of building good libraries and documentation so traditional developers, non-blockchain, can use decentralized infrastructure in an easy way.”
Gutiérrez-Zaldívar wants developers to build blockchain applications with the languages in which they feel most comfortable, whether that be Javascript, Java, C# or Python.
“It’s a way to help developers get into decentralized infrastructure easily,” he said, speaking to me from the Bitcoin 2019 Conference in San Francisco. “We launched an ecosystem fund and invested into the projects that we think are more helpful to bootstrap the ecosystem. So, it’s a combination of things: How do we make the time to market faster for developers? How do we incentivize or follow up with investment that can bring users into these platforms into the RIF and RSK platforms?” For RSK, this has meant working with corporations and governments, because those organizations have a big base of users.
“But, on the other side of things, look at how small the blockchain developer community is versus the broader developer community,” said Gutiérrez-Zaldívar. “And developers are the ones bridging the gap between technology and mass adoption — they are building useful applications to regular people.”
This relationship with developer community in Silicon Valley is key for RSK and RIF adoption, and the main reason the company is opening a developer studio in San Francisco.
“This is the heart of the entrepreneurship worldwide. We wanted to be present here to have this dialogue with the entrepreneurs, and startups. This is key. We are also opening perhaps in Asia, Singapore, and Shanghai. But, from a technology perspective, from a developer perspective, San Francisco will be very important to our relationship with developers and technology companies.”
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Early Look at the Market – Tues 6.6.17 -**PLEASE DO NOT FORWARD THIS DOCUMENT**

J.P. Morgan Early Look at the Market – Tues 6.6.17

find the other bits on /the_street, a /wallstreetbets subsidiary.
PLEASE DO NOT FORWARD THIS DOCUMENT

Morning Levels

Trading Update

Top Headlines for Tuesday

Company-specific news update for Mon night.

Calendar of events to watch for the week of Mon June 5

US – economic growth, monetary policy

Europe

Tech Events – calendar of events coming up over the next few weeks

Full catalyst list

  • Thurs June 8 – China May imports/exports (Wed night/Thurs morning)
  • Thurs June 8 – German industrial production for Apr. 2amET.
  • Thurs June 8 – ECB meeting (7:45amET statement, 8:30amET press conf.).
  • Thurs June 8 – analyst meetings: AZPN, SYMC
  • Thurs June 8 – earnings before the open: Dell, SJM
  • Thurs June 8 – earnings after the close: CLDR, Hudson’s Bay, PAY
  • Thurs June 8 - Jefferies Global Healthcare Conference. June 6-9. NYC.
  • Thurs June 8 - REITWeek: NAREIT Investor Forum. June 6-8. NYC.
  • Fri June 9 – China May CPI/PPI (Thurs night/Fri morning)
  • Fri June 9 – German imports/exports for Apr. 2amET.
  • Fri June 9 – US wholesale inventories/trade sales for Apr. 10amET.
  • Fri June 9 - Jefferies Global Healthcare Conference. June 6-9. NYC.
  • Mon June 12 – earnings after the close: SAIC
  • Tues June 13 – Eurozone ZEW survey expectations for June. 5amET.
  • Tues June 13 – German ZEW survey results for June. 5amET.
  • Tues June 13 – US PPI for May. 8:30amET.
  • Tues June 13 – Morgan Stanley Financials Conf. June 13-14.
  • Tues June 13 – analyst meetings: PSTG
  • Tues June 13 – earnings after the close: HRB
  • Tues June 13 – Citigroup Industrials Conf. June 13-14. Boston.
  • Tues June 13 - Morgan Stanley Financials Conf. June 13-14.
  • Wed June 14 – China May retail sales, FAI, and IP (Tues night/Wed morning)
  • Wed June 14 – Eurozone industrial production for Apr and Q1 employment data. 5amET.
  • Wed June 14 – US CPI and retail sales for May. 8:30amET.
  • Wed June 14 – US business inventories for Apr. 10amET.
  • Wed June 14 – Fed decision (2pmET statement; 2:30pmET press conf.).
  • Wed June 14 – analyst meetings: Deutsche Boerse, MAT
  • Wed June 14 – earnings after the close: JBL
  • Wed June 14 - Citigroup Industrials Conf. June 13-14. Boston.
  • Wed June 14 - Morgan Stanley Financials Conf. June 13-14.
  • Thurs June 15 – Eurozone trade balance for Apr. 5amET.
  • Thurs June 15 – US Empire Manufacturing for June. 8:30amET.
  • Thurs June 15 – US import price index for May.
  • Thurs June 15 – US industrial production for May. 9:15amET.
  • Thurs June 15 – NAHB housing market index for June. 10amET.
  • Thurs June 15 – earnings before the open: KR
  • Thurs June 15 – earnings after the close: FNSR
  • Fri June 16 – Eurozone May new auto registrations. 2amET.
  • Fri June 16 – Eurozone labor costs for Q1 and CPI for May. 5amET.
  • Fri June 16 – BOJ rate decision (Thurs night/Fri morning)
  • Fri June 16 – US housing starts/building permits for May. 8:30amET.
  • Fri June 16 – US Michigan Confidence for June. 10amET.
  • Fri June 16 – analyst meetings: GLW
  • Mon June 19 – China May property prices (Sun night/Mon morning)
  • Mon June 19 – Eurozone construction output for Apr. 5amET.
  • Tues June 20 – Fed speakers: Kaplan
  • Tues June 20 – analyst meetings: ADI, EXLS, GE (at Paris Airshow)
  • Tues June 20 – earnings after the close: ADBE, FDX
  • Wed June 21 – US existing home sales for May. 10amET.
  • Wed June 21 – earnings before the open: KMX
  • Wed June 21 – earnings after the close: ORCL
  • Thurs June 22 – ECB publishes economic bulletin. 4amET.
  • Thurs June 22 – Eurozone consumer confidence for June. 10amET.
  • Thurs June 22 – US FHFA home prices for Apr. 9amET.
  • Thurs June 22 – analyst meetings: V
  • Fri June 23 – Eurozone flash PMIs for June. 4amET.
  • Fri June 23 – US flash PMIs for June. 9:45amET.
  • Fri June 23 – US new home sales for May. 10amET.
  • Fri June 23 – Fed speakers: Mester
  • Tues June 27 – China May industrial profits (Mon night/Tues morning)
  • Wed June 28 – earnings before the open: MON
submitted by SIThereAndThere to wallstreetbets [link] [comments]

List of Today's and Tomorrow's Upcoming Events

I will be bringing you upcoming events/announcements every day. If you want improvements to this post, please mention houseme in the comments. We will make improvements based on your feedback.
 
https://kryptocal.com | /kryptocal | Android | iOS | Telegram Interactive Bot (add cryptocalapp_bot) | Telegram Channel @kryptocal
 

ADD AN EVENT

If you like an event to be added, click Submit Event, and we will do the rest.
 

NEXT DAY UPCOMING EVENTS

 
General
ConnecTech Asia 2019 June 18, 2019
TradeFinex 2019 - ADGM June 18, 2019
Storj(STORJ) Xerocon San Diego 2019 June 18, 2019
SunContract(SNC) Investment Summit -Monaco June 18, 2019
Zilliqa(ZIL) Zilliqa Day 2019 June 18, 2019
Egretia(EGT) OKEx Trading Competition June 18, 2019
Techsauce Global Summit June 19, 2019
Expo-Bitcoin Intl 2019 June 19, 2019
Announcement June 19, 2019
 
Blockchains
White Night Hackathon June 18, 2019
Dragonchain(DRGN) DRGN Amsterdam Afterparty June 19, 2019
Achain(ACT) Blockchain Expo Europe June 19, 2019
 
Meetups
Nano(NANO) NANO UK Meetup June 18, 2019
Ravencoin(RVN) Ravencoin Meetup Europe June 19, 2019
 
Exchanges
Skycoin(SKY) Coinsuper Listing June 18, 2019
WaykiChain(WICC) Gate.io Listing June 18, 2019
 
Conferences
XinFin Network(XDCE) TradeFinex 2019-ADGM Roundtable Blockchain Conference June 18, 2019 9:00 AM - 5:30 PM
 
 
submitted by cryptocalbot to kryptocal [link] [comments]

[Meta] This is why I think it would be better (for everyone!) to remove the ideological/political subs from the sidebar.

Here's to hoping we can actually have an adult discussion on the subject, preferably even without downvoting based on opinion (although I'm realistic enough to realize that is probably not gonna happen).
It would also be nice if we could leave the ad-hominem arguments at the door. Just because someone is a 'statist' or an anarchist does not mean he or she can't have a useful argument.
Also, let me make one thing clear up front. I have noticed that this is hard to believe for some people, but I am not trying to get my own ideology included in the sidebar of this sub. That is not my mission, and never will be. I am not trying to politicize bitcoin or this sub to fit my own cause. Moreover, even though I have no way to prove this, and some won't believe it, I can guarantee you that even if 'my' ideology was included in the sidebar, I would still argue to get rid of it.
This is because I am actually making a plea for NEUTRALITY. For me, the beauty of bitcoin is that it is not owned or controlled by anybody, much like the internet itself. You can own and control bitcoins of course, but nobody can own or control bitcoin. No individual, no corporation, and no government. The code is open source, and the blockchain is publicly 'owned'.
And I genuinely do believe that bitcoin is a neutral currency. It can be used by anyone and everyone. This includes tech-geeks, corporations, drugdealers, my grandmother, and yes, governments. (If some government – any government – would decide to legally enforce bitcoin tomorrow, that would be totally possible and should be absolutely fine, I think. As long as they don't seek to control it – and I personally don't think that they would be able to.)
This case for neutrality is not something new, of course. There was even a talk at the bitcoin conference in San Diego regarding bitcoin neutrality, which can be watched here.
Quote:
Bitcoin neutrality is about making bitcoin a standard that is independent of your desires and expectations. This isn't a libertarian currency any more than it is a communist currency. It's a currency.
I, for one, wholeheartedly agree.
Moreover, if we want to get bitcoin adopted on a serious scale, I think that it is not just important that bitcoin is neutral, I also believe that it is important to present bitcoin as a neutral currency – a currency for everyone and anyone.
Reddit has millions of readers, many of them will learn about bitcoin through /bitcoin. And whether you like it or not, a lot of people will be put off if they see that it 'is' an anarcho-capitalist or libertarian currency. (I and many like me don't think that is it, but that is what many will think when they see the sidebar.)
I think that an ideological claim can hold bitcoin adoption back. That's not something anything should want – including libertarians and anarcho-capitalists.
Imagine this. What if some early adopter of bitcoin was a big fan of drugs, and believes that drug-use would make for a better society. (These people exist; Timothy Leary is one example I can think of from the top of my head.) Since this drugs-dude is a (very) early adopter, he decides to create /bitcoin. He might include /silkroad in the sidebar, as well as /drugs, /trees, /lsd, /drugpolicy, etc. After all, the communities overlap (especially /silkroad of course), bitcoin was first massively used to buy drugs, and the potentially anonymous nature of bitcoin provides a great way to buy drugs. And hey, he recently even experienced an LSD-trip in which aliens told him that bitcoin is especially created for a drug-abundant world! Although he would be right about all of these things, I would still argue against including these subs in the sidebar, because:
1) While bitcoin can be used for drug-related issues, it can be used for many other purposes. Bitcoin itself is neutral.
2) It puts newcomers off bitcoin.
One more example. What if this Christian guy was a (very) early adopter of bitcoin. I'm not sure what he beliefs exactly, but perhaps he beliefs that fiat money is the faith of the atheist, and that Jesus Christ has come down to earth in the form of bitcoin or Satoshi Nakamoto to safe us all (from our debt-based society). So he crates /bitcoin and includes /christianity, /jesus, /bible, /teleos, or whatever in the sidebar. Again, I could actually understand why he would do that, bitcoin might really provide a perfect solution for his beliefs. Hell he would probably even point at some Bible-texts that 'endorsed' or 'predicted' bitcoin or whatever as proof that it is a Christian-currency. But I would still argue against including these subs in the sidebar, because:
1) While bitcoin could be perfect for Christians and a Christian society, it can be used by many other people as well. Bitcoin itself is neutral.
2) It puts newcomers off bitcoin.
I honestly believe that the same is true for anarcho-capitalism and libertarianism.
1) While bitcoin could be perfect for anarcho-capitalists and libertarians, or an anarcho-capitalist or libertarian society, it can be used by many other people as well. Bitcoin itself is neutral.
2) It puts newcomers off bitcoin.
I know that a lot of people around here will disagree that bitcoin is not anarcho-capitalist or libertarian, but Reddit didn't allow me to include some of the commonly heard arguments for the inclusion of the ideological subs in this textpost (and my rebuttals to them): my post was becoming to long. So I'll include them in the comments instead - if Reddit allows me to. I hope I'm not making any strawmans, and I certainly don't mean to. Correct me anywhere you wish.
PS: I don't know a whole lot about Austrian economics (395 subscribers, wtf), and I don't even know what agorism (~2000 subscribers) is, but I'm for removing anything that's not neutral, in case that wasn't clear. And possibly even anything that's not directly bitcoin-related, but that's kind of a different discussion.
TL;DR: rmove ideolgcl sdbrs pls.
edit: spelling
submitted by EwoutDVP to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Help Crowdfund the CRYPTO movie, telling the story of Satoshi Nakamoto and the Libertarian reasons for the invention of cryptocurrency

Many of you are looking for opportunities to help support Libertarian causes, this is one I can vouch for:
Here's the trailer:
https://vimeo.com/273223403
And here is the donation campaign:
https://atomicnetwork.tv/product/crypto-crowdfund/
They're looking for $450k, and they've already raised $100k+.
The man behind this is the organizer of the Libertopia conference in San Diego and himself a resolute libertarian.
Here's the movie summary:
In 2009, an enigmatic genius known only as ‘Satoshi Nakamoto’ released Bitcoin, sparking a technological revolution that is on its way to disrupting the global financial system as we know it.
CRYPTO will weave the mysterious and thrilling story of the cypherpunks behind the blockchain revolution, and bring us through the present into our decentralized future.
With your help, we’ll create the film that will show Satoshi’s vision to the world. Join Satoshi’s revolution, and help us crowdfund the story of the century.
Help get the truth about the creation of crypto into people's hands by funding the CRYPTO movie!
If everyone subscribed to this sub kicked them $15 it'd be funded. $15, what is that, skipping one dinner or like three lattes?
Kick 'em a few dollars, whatever you're able. I'm going to donate $50 right now.
Also check out the rewards for various donation levels. Do you have $10,000 to spare and want to be in the film as a cypherpunk extra? That's one of the rewards! Want to be a producer? They have that position too.
There's all kinds of rewards on there, check it out:
https://atomicnetwork.tv/product/crypto-crowdfund/
submitted by Anenome5 to GoldandBlack [link] [comments]

Man and wife try to live in “sea stead” off shore Thailand in international waters

This is the best tl;dr I could make, original reduced by 40%. (I'm a bot)
Australian police have charged 38 year old Alex Dion with murder of a Thai national - the body found bound and gagged on a Sydney roadside.
He has been charged with the 2018 murder of Wachira "Mario" Phetmang after he arrived in Sydney from California under police guard.
The arrest warrant for Dion was issued last September while he already was in custody on a domestic violence charge in San Diego.
Dion, a US national, is believed to have left Australia on May 27, more than a week before the body was found and formally identified.
When Australian police held a news conference seeking the public's help in the case, Dion called them and tried to blame an associate for Wachira's killing, while also acknowledging that he had Wachira's credit cards and cellphones with him in San Diego, according to the search warrant.
Dion told police that he had met Wachira at the gas station to purchase drugs but that he left when their associate showed up, a story police claim is contradicted by surveillance footage.
Summary Source | FAQ | Feedback | Top keywords: police#1 Dion#2 Wachira#3 Sydney#4 last#5
Post found in /news.
NOTICE: This thread is for discussing the submission topic. Please do not discuss the concept of the autotldr bot here.
submitted by autotldr to autotldr [link] [comments]

Agustín Carstens, General Manager of the Bank for International Settlements (BIS, the central bank of central banks) on Cryptocurrencies today

I'd like to hear your thoughts on his lecture held today at the Goethe University in Frankfurt, Germany.
Read the full transcript here or via pdf link. https://www.bis.org/speeches/sp180206.pdf
1/10 Money in the digital age: what role for central banks? Lecture by Agustín Carstens General Manager, Bank for International Settlements House of Finance, Goethe University Frankfurt, 6 February 2018
Introduction Good morning, ladies and gentlemen. Thank you for that kind introduction, Jens. I am very happy to be here at this prestigious university and to be part of this impressive lecture series sponsored by Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe (SAFE), the Center for Financial Studies (CFS) and the Deutsche Bundesbank. I would also like to thank Professor Brigitte Haar for being such a generous host today. It is an honour to discuss money at an event organised by the Bundesbank, which has been a beacon of stability since its foundation some 60 years ago. As Jens can attest, being a central banker is a fascinating job. In fact, it is a privilege. During the last decade it has been anything but quiet in the central banking world. We have been confronted with extraordinary circumstances that have required extraordinary policy responses. In such an environment, it has been of the utmost importance to share experiences and lessons learnt among central banks, creating a body of knowledge that will be there for the future. One of the reasons that central bank Governors from all over the world gather in Basel every two months is precisely to discuss issues at the front and centre of the policy debate. Following the Great Financial Crisis, many hours have been spent discussing the design and implications of, for example, unconventional monetary policies such as quantitative easing and negative interest rates. Lately, we have seen a bit of a shift, to issues at the very heart of central banking. This shift is driven by developments at the cutting edge of technology. While it has been bubbling under the surface for years, the meteoric rise of bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies has led us to revisit some fundamental questions that touch on the origin and raison d’être for central banks: • What is money? • What constitutes good money, and where do cryptocurrencies fit in? • And, finally, what role should central banks play? The thrust of my lecture will be that, at the end of the day, money is an indispensable social convention backed by an accountable institution within the State that enjoys public trust. Many things have served as money, but experience suggests that something widely accepted, reliably provided and stable in its command over goods and services works best. Experience has also shown that to be credible, money requires institutional backup, which is best provided by a central bank. While central banks’ actions and services will evolve with technological developments, the rise of cryptocurrencies only highlights the important role central banks have played, and continue to play, as stewards of public trust. Private digital tokens posing as currencies, such as bitcoin and other crypto-assets that have mushroomed of late, must not endanger this trust in the fundamental value and nature of money.
What is money? “What is money?” is obviously a key question for any central banker, and one on which economists have spent much ink. The answer depends on how deep and philosophical one wants to be. Being at a university, especially one named after Goethe, I think I can err on the side of being philosophical. Conventional wisdom tells you that “money is what money does”.1 That is, money is a unit of account, a means of payment and a store of value. But telling you what something does does not really tell you what it is. And it certainly does not tell you why we need or have money, how it comes about and what the preconditions are for it to exist. In terms of the “need” for money, you may learn that money is a way to get around the general lack of double coincidence of wants. That is, it is rare that I have what you want and you have what I want at the same time. As barter is definitely not an efficient way of organising an economy, money is demanded as a tool to facilitate exchange. What about the other side of the coin, so to speak? How does money come about? Again, conventional wisdom may tell you that central banks provide money, ie cash (coins and notes), and commercial banks supply deposits. But this answer is often not fully satisfactory, as it does not tell why and how banks should be the one to “create” money. If you venture into more substantive analyses on monetary economics, things get more complex. One theory, which proposes that “money is memory”, amounts to arguing that a “superledger” can facilitate exchange just like money. This argument says a ledger is a way of keeping track of not only who has what but also who owes, and is owed, what. I will come back to this later. Moving beyond this line of thought, other scholarly and historical analyses provide answers that are more philosophical. These often amount to “money is a convention” – one party accepts it as payment in the expectation that others will also do so.2 Money is an IOU, but a special one because everyone in the economy trusts that it will be accepted by others in exchange for goods and services. One might say money is a “we all owe you”. Many things have served as money in this way. Figure 1 gives some examples: Yap stones, gold coins, cigarettes in war times, $100,000 bills, wissel (Wechsel), ie bills of exchange or bearer notes, such as those issued by the Bank of Amsterdam in the first half of the 17th century. It includes an example from my own country, Aztec hoe (or axe) money, a form of (unstamped) money made of copper used in central Mexico and parts of Central America. 1 See J Hicks, Critical essays in monetary theory, 1979. 2 See D Lewis, Convention: a philosophical study, 1969.
Common to most of these examples is that the nominal value of the items that have served at one time as money is unrelated to their intrinsic value. Indeed, as we know very well in the case of fiat money, the intrinsic value of most of its representations is zero. History shows that money as a convention needs to have a basis of trust, supported by some form of institutional arrangement.3 As Curzio Giannini puts it: “The evolution of monetary institutions appears to be above all the fruit of a continuous dialogue between economic and political spheres, with each taking turns to create monetary innovations … and to safeguard the common interest against abuse stemming from partisan interests.”4 Money can come in different institutional forms and colours. How to organise them? The paper by Bech and Garratt in last September’s BIS Quarterly Review presented the money flower as a way of organising monies in today’s environment.5 It acknowledges that money can take on rather different forms and be supplied in various ways. The money flower Allow me to explain, noting that we do not sell seeds to this money flower! 3 Fiat means “by law“. So, in principle, it should be said that money exists by convention or by law. But if trust in money does not prevail, the legal mandate that conveys value to money becomes meaningless. 4 C Giannini, The age of central banks, 2011. 5 M Bech and R Garratt, “Central bank cryptocurrencies”, BIS Quarterly Review, September 2017, pp 55–70.
The money flower highlights four key properties on the supply side of money: the issuer, the form, the degree of accessibility and the transfer mechanism. • The issuer can be either the central bank or “other”. “Other” includes nobody, that is, a particular type of money that is not the liability of anyone. • In terms of the form it takes, money is either electronic or physical. • Accessibility refers to how widely the type of money is available. It can either be wide or limited. • Transfer mechanism can either be a central intermediary or peer-to-peer, meaning transactions occur directly between the payer and the payee without the need for a central intermediary. Let us look at where some common types of money fit into the flower, starting with cash (or bank notes) as we know it today. Cash is issued by the central bank, is not electronic, is available to everyone and is peer-to-peer. I do not need a trusted third party such as Jens to help me pay each of you 10 euros. Let us try another one: bank deposits. They are not the liability of the central bank, mostly electronic, and in most countries available to most people, but clearly not peer-to-peer. Transferring resources from a bank deposit requires the involvement of at least your own bank, perhaps the central bank and the recipient’s bank. Think here not only of commercial bank deposits but also bills, eg non-interest bearing (bearer) certificates, issued privately, as in the case of the Bank of Amsterdam mentioned earlier. Local or regional currencies are the ones that can be spent in a particular geographical location at participating organisations. They tend to be physical. The túmin, for example, was a local currency circulating (illegally) for some time around 2010 exclusively in the Mexican municipality of Espinal. What does digitalisation mean for the flower? Digitalisation is nothing new: financial services and most forms of money have been largely digital for many years. Much of the ongoing transformation is just adding a mobile version for many services, which means that the device becomes a virtual extension of the institution. As such, there is not a new model. The money flower then also easily accommodates these forms.
That is also the case for the digital, account-based forms of money that central banks traditionally have made available to commercial banks and, in some instances, to certain other financial or public institutions (ie bank reserves). It would also be the case if the central bank were to issue digital money to the wider public for general purposes. Each central bank will have to make its own decision on whether issuing digital money is desirable, after considering factors such as the structure of the financial system and underlying preferences for privacy. The central bank community is actively analysing this issue. A potentially important and leapfrogging digital-related development, however, is distributed ledger technology (DLT), the basis for Bitcoin. Many think DLT could transform financial service provision, maybe first wholesale, then possibly retail. For example, it could enhance settlement efficiency involving securities and derivatives transactions. A few central banks have conducted experiments in this area, for example the Bank of Canada, the Bundesbank, the Monetary Authority of Singapore and the Bank of England.6 Yet doubts remain regarding the maturity of DLT and the size of associated efficiency gains relative to existing technologies. Moreover, their robustness, including to cyber-risk, is still to be fully understood and ascertained. Still, there are potential benefits, and I expect that central banks will remain engaged on this topic.7 For now, DLT is largely used to “create” bitcoin and other digital currencies. Such cryptocurrencies can be placed easily in the money flower. Nobody issues them, they are not physical and they are peer-to-peer. But beyond that, how should one think about them? What constitutes good money? Just because we are able to find a place for bitcoin in our money flower does not mean we should consider it as “good” money. As I mentioned before, trust is the fundamental tenet that underpins credible currencies, and this trust has to be earned and supported. There are many lessons from history and institutional economics on the earning of trust that we can use as we move further into digitalisation.8 Over the ages, many forms of private money have come and gone. It is fair to say that the same has happened with various experiments with public money (that is, money issued by a public entity that is not the central bank). While some lasted longer than others, most have invariably given way to some form of central bank money. The main reason for their disappearance is that the “incentives to cheat” are simply too high. Let me give three historical examples: one in Germany, another in the United States and the last one in Mexico. In Germany, the Thirty Years War (1618–48), involving small German states of the Holy Roman Empire and neighbouring regional powers, was associated with one of the most severe economic crises ever recorded, with rampant hyperinflation – just as happened three centuries later during the Weimar Republic – and the breakdown of trade and economic activity. The crisis became known as the Kipper- und Wipperzeit (the clipping and culling times), after the practice of clipping coins (shaving metal from their circumference) and sorting good coins from bad. This morning, we are launching a BIS Working Paper, by Professor Isabel Schnabel and BIS Economic Adviser Hyun Song Shin, which further details and explains this experience, as background to my speech. 6 See Bech and Garratt, op cit. 7 See Committee on Payments and Market Infrastructures, Distributed ledger technology in payment, clearing and settlement: an analytical framework, February 2017. 8 See D North, Institutions, institutional change and economic performance, 1990.
While episodes of currency debasement have occurred throughout history, this one stands out for two reasons. First is the severity of the crisis and its rapid regional spread. Debasement proceeded at such a pace that public authorities quickly lost control of the downward spiral. Second is how the debasement was brought under control. This occurred through standardisation of wholesale payments by public deposit banks, for example the Bank of Hamburg and the Bank of Amsterdam. These were in many ways examples of the precursors of modern central banks. As the working paper argues, monetary order could be brought to an otherwise chaotic situation by providing reliable payment means through precursors to central bank money, which at the end means the use of a credible institutional arrangement. In the period in the United States known as the Free Banking Era, from 1837 to 1863, many banks sprang up that issued currency with no oversight of any kind by the federal government.10 These so-called free bank notes did not work very well as a medium of exchange. Given that there were so many banks of varying reputations issuing notes, they sold at different prices in different places, making transactions quite complicated. And as supervision was largely absent, banks had limited restraint in issuing notes and did not back them up sufficiently with specie (gold or silver), thereby debasing their values. This era of “wildcat banking” ended up being a long and costly period of banking instability in the history of the US, with banking panics and major disruptions to economic activity. It was, after some further hiccups, followed by the establishment of the Federal Reserve System in 1913. Let me present a final example, from Mexican monetary history. A little known fact is that Mexico had the first series of hyperinflations at the beginning of the 20th century. My country had a revolution from 1910 to 1921, in which no central government existed in an effective way, with many factions fighting and disputing different territories. A winning faction would arrive in a territory, print its own money and make void previously issued cash. So different bills issued by different factions coexisted, leading to chaos and hyperinflation. To give you an idea of the disorder, in 2015 four trunks full of bills were returned to Mexico after having been appropriated by the US Navy in 1914, when the US occupied the port city of Veracruz. In the trunks, the Bank of Mexico discovered dozens of types of bills that the central bank had not even known existed.11 At the end of the conflict, a new constitution was drafted, having as a central article one which gave the Bank of Mexico the appropriate institutional framework, designating it the exclusive issuer of currency in the country. Once this was in place, hyperinflation ceased, illustrating the importance of controlling fiscal dominance (which tends to be the result of the abuse of publicly issued money). Based on these experiences, most observers, and I suspect all of you here, would agree that laissez-faire is not a good approach in banking or in the issuance of money. Indeed, the paradigm of strict bank regulation and supervision and central banks overseeing the financial and monetary system that has emerged over the last century or so has proven to be the most effective way to avoid the instability and high economic costs associated with the proliferation of private and public monies. 9 I Schnabel and H S Shin, “Money and trust: lessons from the 1620s for money in the digital age”, BIS Working Papers, no 698, February 2018. 10 See G Dwyer, “Wildcat banking, banking panics, and free banking in the United States”, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta Economic Review, vol 81, nos 3–6, 1996; A Rolnick and W Weber, “New evidence of the free banking era”, The American Economic Review, vol 73, no 5, December 1983, pp 1080–91; and C Calomiris, “Banking crises yesterday and today”, Financial History Review, vol 17, no 1, 2010, pp 3–12. 11 See Bank of Mexico, “La SRE entregó al Banco de México un acervo de billetes de la época del porfiriato”, press release, 1 June 2015, www.banxico.org.mx/informacion-para-la-prensa/comunicados/billetes-y-monedas/billetes/%7B3A41E6F8-FBD8-2FA7-DA0B-66FCCE46430A%7D.pdf.
The unhappy experience with private forms of money raises deep questions about whether the proliferation of cryptocurrencies is desirable or sustainable. Even if the supply of one type of cryptocurrency is limited, the mushrooming of so many of them means that the total supply of all forms of cryptocurrency is unlimited. Added to this is the practice of “forking”, where an offshoot of an existing cryptocurrency can be conjured up from thin air. Given the experience with currency debasement that has peppered history, the proliferation of such private monies should give everyone pause for thought. I will return to this shortly. We have learned over the centuries that money as a social institution requires a solution to the problem of a lack of trust.12 The central banks that often emerged in the wake of the private and public money collapses may not have looked like the ones we have today, but they all had some institutional backing. The forms of this backing for their issuance of money have differed over time and by country.13 Commodity money has often been the start. History shows that gold and other precious metals stored in the vault with governance (and physical) safeguards can provide some assurance. Commodity money is not the only or necessarily sufficient mechanism. Often it also required a city-, state- or nation-provided charter, as with the emergence of giro banks in many European countries. Later, the willingness of central banks to convert money for gold at a fixed price (the gold standard) was the mechanism. Currency boards, where local money is issued one-to-one with changes in foreign currency holdings, can also work to provide credibility. The tried, trusted and resilient modern way to provide confidence in public money is the independent central bank. This means legal safeguards and agreed goals, ie clear monetary policy objectives, operational, instrument and administrative independence, together with democratic accountability to ensure broad-based political support and legitimacy. While not fully immune from the temptation to cheat, central banks as an institution are hard to beat in terms of safeguarding society’s economic and political interest in a stable currency. Where do cryptocurrencies fit in? One could argue that bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies’ attractiveness lies in an intelligent application of DLT. DLT provides a method to broadcast transactions publicly and pseudonymously in a way that achieves in principle ledger immutability.14 Who would have thought that having people guessing solutions to what was described to me by a techie as the mathematical equivalent of mega-sudokus would be a way to generate consensus among strangers around the world through a proof of work? Does it thus provide a novel solution to the problem of how to generate trust among people who do not know each other? If DLT provides the potential for a superledger, could bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies then substitute for some forms of money?15 We do not have the full answers, but at this time the answer, also in the light of historical experiences, is probably a sound no, for many reasons. In fact, we are seeing the type of cracks and cheating that brought down other private currencies starting to appear in the House of Bitcoin. As an institution, Bitcoin has some obvious flaws. 12 See M King, “The institutions of monetary policy”, speech at the American Economic Association Annual Meeting, San Diego, 4 January 2004. 13 See Giannini, op cit. 14 See Committee on Payments and Market Infrastructures, op cit. 15 See N Kocherlakota, “Money is memory”, Journal of Economic Theory, vol 81, pp 232–51, 1998. In fact, he shows in a very stark setting that having a costless means to record the memory of all economic actors, both present and past, can do as much as money, and sometimes more. Conversely, money effectively functions as memory by providing an observable record of past transactions – that is, agents can tell whether a potential trader is running a current deficit or surplus with society by looking at the money balances that trader is carrying. The finding, however, is theoretical and not robust to slight changes in assumptions, including the risk of loss of data.
Debasement. As I mentioned, we may be seeing the modern-day equivalent of clipping and culling. In Bitcoin, these take the form of forks, a type of spin-off in which developers clone Bitcoin’s software, release it with a new name and a new coin, after possibly adding a few new features or tinkering with the algorithms’ parameters. Often, the objective is to capitalise on the public’s familiarity with Bitcoin to make some serious money, at least virtually. Last year alone, 19 Bitcoin forks came out, including Bitcoin Cash, Bitcoin Gold and Bitcoin Diamond. Forks can fork again, and many more could happen. After all, it just takes a bunch of smart programmers and a catchy name. As in the past, these modern-day clippings dilute the value of existing ones, to the extent such cryptocurrencies have any economic value at all. Trust. As the saying goes, trust takes years to build, seconds to break and forever to repair. Historical experiences suggest that these “assets” are probably not sustainable as money. Cryptocurrencies are not the liability of any individual or institution, or backed by any authority. Governance weaknesses, such as the concentration of their ownership, could make them even less trustworthy. Indeed, to use them often means resorting to an intermediary (for example, the bitcoin exchanges) to which one has to trust one’s money. More generally, they piggyback on the same institutional infrastructure that serves the overall financial system and on the trust that it provides. This reflects their challenge to establish their own trust in the face of cyber-attacks, loss of customers’ funds, limits on transferring funds and inadequate market integrity. Inefficiency. Novel technology is not the same as better technology or better economics. That is clearly the case with Bitcoin: while perhaps intended as an alternative payment system with no government involvement, it has become a combination of a bubble, a Ponzi scheme and an environmental disaster. The volatility of bitcoin renders it a poor means of payment and a crazy way to store value. Very few people use it for payments or as a unit of account. In fact, at a major cryptocurrency conference the registration fee could not be paid with bitcoins because it was too costly and slow: only conventional money was accepted. To the extent they are used, bitcoins and their cousins seem more attractive to those who want to make transactions in the black or illegal economy, rather than everyday transactions. In a way, this should not be surprising, since individuals who massively evade taxes or launder money are the ones who are willing to live with cryptocurrencies’ extreme price volatility. In practice, central bank experiments show that DLT-based systems are very expensive to run and slower and much less efficient to operate than conventional payment and settlement systems. The electricity used in the process of mining bitcoins is staggering, estimated to be equal to the amount Singapore uses every day in electricity,16 making them socially wasteful and environmentally bad. Therefore, the current fascination with these cryptocurrencies seems to have more to do with a speculative mania than any use as a form of electronic payment, except for illegal activities. Accordingly, authorities are edging closer and closer to clamping down to contain the risks related to cryptocurrencies. There is a strong case for policy intervention. As now noted by many securities markets and regulatory and supervisory agencies, these assets can raise concerns related to consumer and investor protection. Appropriate authorities have a duty to educate and protect investors and consumers, and need to be prepared to act. Moreover, there are concerns related to tax evasion, money laundering and criminal finance. Authorities should welcome innovation. But they have a duty to make sure technological advances are not used to legitimise profits from illegal activities. 16 See Digiconomist, “Bitcoin energy consumption index”, digiconomist.net/bitcoin-energy-consumption.
What role for the central bank? Central banks, acting by themselves and/or in coordination with other financial authorities like bank regulators and supervisors, ministries of finance, tax agencies and financial intelligence units, may also need to act, given their roles in providing money services and safeguarding money’s real value. Working with commercial banks, authorities have a part to play in policing the digital frontier. Commercial banks are on the front line since they are the ones settling trades, providing real liquidity, keeping exchanges going and interacting with customers. It is alarming that some banks have advertised “bitcoin ATMs” where you can buy and sell bitcoins. Authorities need to ensure commercial banks do not facilitate unscrupulous behaviours. Central banks need to safeguard payment systems. To date, Bitcoin is not functional as a means of payment, but it relies on the oxygen provided by the connection to standard means of payments and trading apps that link users to conventional bank accounts. If the only “business case” is use for illicit or illegal transactions, central banks cannot allow such tokens to rely on much of the same institutional infrastructure that serves the overall financial system and freeload on the trust that it provides. Authorities should apply the principle that the Basel Process has adhered to for years: to provide a level playing field to all participants in financial markets (banks and non-banks alike), while at the same time fostering innovative, secure and competitive markets. In this context, this means, among other things, ensuring that the same high standards that money transfer and payment service providers have to meet are also met by Bitcoin-type exchanges. It also means ensuring that legitimate banking and payment services are only offered to those exchanges and products that meet these high standards. Financial authorities may also have a case to intervene to ensure financial stability. To date, many judge that, given cryptocurrencies’ small size and limited interconnectedness, concerns about them do not rise to a systemic level. But if authorities do not act pre-emptively, cryptocurrencies could become more interconnected with the main financial system and become a threat to financial stability. Most importantly, the meteoric rise of cryptocurrencies should not make us forget the important role central banks play as stewards of public trust. Private digital tokens masquerading as currencies must not subvert this trust. As history has shown, there simply is no substitute. Still, central banks are embracing new technologies as appropriate. Many new developments can help. For example, fintech and “techfin” – which refers to established technology platforms venturing into financial services. These are changing financial service provision in many countries, most clearly in payments, and especially in some emerging market economies (for example, China and Kenya). While they introduce the possibility of non-bank financial institutions introducing money-type instruments, which raises a familiar set of regulatory questions, they do present scope for many gains. Conclusion In conclusion, while cryptocurrencies may pretend to be currencies, they fail the basic textbook definitions. Most would agree that they do not function as a unit of account. Their volatile valuations make them unsafe to rely on as a common means of payment and a stable store of value. They also defy lessons from theory and experiences. Most importantly, given their many fragilities, cryptocurrencies are unlikely to satisfy the requirement of trust to make them sustainable forms of money. While new technologies have the potential to improve our lives, this is not invariably the case. Thus, central banks must be prepared to intervene if needed. After all, cryptocurrencies piggyback on the institutional infrastructure that serves the wider financial system, gaining a semblance of legitimacy from their links to it. This clearly falls under central banks’ area of responsibility. The buck stops here. But the buck also starts here. Credible money will continue to arise from central bank decisions, taken in the light of day and in the public interest. In particular, central banks and financial authorities should pay special attention to two aspects. First, to the ties linking cryptocurrencies to real currencies, to ensure that the relationship is not parasitic. And second, to the level playing field principle. This means “same risk, same regulation”. And no exceptions allowed.
submitted by stellan0r to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

The Salton Sea: The Skeleton in California's Closet - YouTube The Black Blockchain Summit 2018 - Washington DC Reegan's Blockchain Journey #14 - Bitcoin Private Boursorama - YouTube I leave my pet raccoon unattended for an hour! - YouTube

What Is Bitcoin 2019 Conference? Bitcoin 2019 is a two-day conference for the Bitcoin community that will take place in SVN West – San Francisco, CA on 25 th – 26 th June 2019.. The conference will bring together players in the Bitcoin community with the aim of accelerating Bitcoin adoption, increasing its potential, facilitating collaborations, and strengthening the community through ... Keep up to date with the latest bitcoin event news on CoinDesk. You can also check out local Bitcoin Meetups in your area. CoinDesk also runs the Consensus Conference and an ‘Expert Briefings ... There are now 27 bitcoin ATMs in operation in San Diego County, said cryptocurrency tracker Coin ATM Radar. The first eight opened in 2014, but by 2016 there were just five, the company said. San Diego • San Diego, CA Share Develop a Successful Sustainability Startup Business Today! with your friends. Save Develop a Successful Sustainability Startup Business Today! to your collection. Bitcoin 2019 is a two-day event packed with keynote speakers, presentations, workshops, networking, and more! View the full schedule here. With a rooftop beer garden, bitcoin art gallery & more, SVN West will host SF's biggest Bitcoin party of the Summer! Get your 2-day passes for $249.

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The Salton Sea: The Skeleton in California's Closet - YouTube

Bienvenue sur la chaîne YouTube de Boursorama ! Le portail boursorama.com compte plus de 30 millions de visites mensuelles et plus de 290 millions de pages v... At Cryptocurrency Market we are reaching out to connect with like minded people to support the projects we believe in. Join us Wednesday, March 14, 2018 to celebrate the successful fork of Bitcoin ... I left Tito The Raccoon unattended outside of his enclosure to see what he would do while no one was watching! Watch the whole video to see what kind of misc... News Live News live san diego Watch Live - Fox 5 San Diego Watch Live - Fox 5 San DiegoMobile Apps; Android App · iPhone & iPad App · Breaking News Alerts · Facebook · Twitter · Instagram ... Nairobi-based blockchain accelerator, Bithub Africa, is co-hosting the largest Black Blockchain Summit in 2018 which will be held on 10 and 11 September 2018 at the Howard University in Washington ...

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